The Green Papers
2020 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses, and Conventions

Disclaimer:
These pages contain a combination of official, unofficial, and estimated data. The information posted here is subject to change.

 
Copyright www.flags.net/UNST.htm Democratic Convention
Presidential Nominating Process
1st Democratic Primary Debate in Miami (NBC News, MSNBC, Telemundo): Wednesday 26 June - Thursday 27 June 2019
2nd Democratic Primary Debate in Detroit (CNN): Tuesday 30 July - Wednesday 31 July 2019
3rd Democratic Primary Debate in Houston (ABC News, Univision): Thursday 12 September 2019
4th Democratic Primary Debate in Ohio (CNN, The New York Times): Tuesday 15 October 2019
5th Democratic Primary Debate: Wednesday 20 November 2019
6th Democratic Debate: Thursday 19 December 2019
7th Democratic Debate: Tuesday 14 January 2020
8th Democratic Debate: Friday 7 February 2020
9th Democratic Debate in Las Vegas: Wednesday 19 February 2020
10th Democratic Debate in South Carolina: Tuesday 25 February 2020
Confirmation of Automatic delegates: Friday 6 March 2020
11th Democratic Primary Debate in Pheonix (CNN, Univision, Congressional Hispanic Caucus)): Sunday 15 March 2020
12th Democratic Primary Debate: April 2020 (presumably)
48th Democratic National Convention: Monday 17 August - Thursday 20 August 2020
Democrats
CandidateDelegate Votes
Hard TotalFloor
Biden, Joseph Robinette "Joe", Jr.2,698  56.81%3,558  74.92%
Sanders, Bernard "Bernie"1,115  23.48%1,151  24.24%
(available)770  16.21%35   0.74%
abstention 5   0.11%
Warren, Elizabeth Ann78   1.64% 
Bloomberg, Michael Rubens "Mike"51   1.07% 
Buttigieg, Peter Paul Montgomery "Pete"26   0.55% 
Klobuchar, Amy Jean7   0.15% 
Gabbard, Tulsi2   0.04% 
Uncommitted2   0.04% 
Total4,749 100.00%4,749 100.00%
 

Nationwide Popular Vote

CandidatePop
Vote
%
Joseph Robinette "Joe" Biden, Jr.19,076,05251.79%
Bernard "Bernie" Sanders9,679,21326.28%
Elizabeth Ann Warren2,831,4727.69%
Michael Rubens "Mike" Bloomberg2,488,7346.76%
Peter Paul Montgomery "Pete" Buttigieg924,2372.51%
Amy Jean Klobuchar529,7131.44%
Tulsi Gabbard273,9400.74%
Thomas Fahr "Tom" Steyer259,7920.71%
Andrew Yang170,5170.46%
BLANK138,9030.38%
Uncommitted130,0810.35%
Michael Farrand Bennet63,1240.17%
Julián Castro37,0370.10%
Cory Anthony Booker31,5750.09%
No Preference31,3990.09%
Deval Laurdine Patrick27,9620.08%
Marianne Williamson22,3340.06%
John Kevin Delaney19,3380.05%
David Lee Rice15,4700.04%
Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente, III13,6100.04%
Misc.12,9790.04%
Uncommitted Delegate6,4610.02%
Joseph A. "Joe" Sestak, Jr.5,2510.01%
Michael Rubens "Mike" Bloomberg (write-in)4,6750.01%
VOID4,6210.01%
Blanks4,0610.01%
Michael A. Ellinger3,6270.01%
Uninstructed Delegate3,5900.01%
Write-in3,4430.01%
Robert Carr "Robby" Wells, Jr.3,3540.01%
Mark Stewart Greenstein3,3310.01%
Mosemarie Dora "Mosie" Boyd2,0640.01%
All Others1,9400.01%
Steve Burke1,7830.00%
Scattering1,5750.00%
Donald John Trump (write-in)1,2170.00%
Kamala D. Harris8440.00%
Steve Bullock5490.00%
Andrew Yang (write-in)5020.00%
Rita Anna-Maria Krichevsky4680.00%
William C. "Bill" Haas3920.00%
Undervotes3560.00%
Henry Hewes3450.00%
Blank votes3230.00%
Blank Ballots2750.00%
Other1980.00%
Velma Steinman1910.00%
Leonard J. Steinman, II1750.00%
Scatter (write-in)1570.00%
Overvotes1460.00%
**UNSIGNED**870.00%
Tom Koos720.00%
Nathan Bloxham690.00%
David John Thistle530.00%
Lorenz Kraus520.00%
**BLANK**390.00%
Sam Sloan340.00%
Ben "Gleib" Gleiberman310.00%
Thomas James Torgesen300.00%
Robert Jordan (write-in)200.00%
William Floyd "Bill" Weld (write-in)170.00%
Jason Evritte Dunlap120.00%
Romney (write-in)100.00%
Daphne Denise Bradford (write-in)80.00%
Raymond Michael Moroz80.00%
**OVERVOTE**70.00%
Nakia Lacquers Anthony (write-in)30.00%
Willie Felix Carter (write-in)30.00%
Richard "Rick" Kraft (write-in)20.00%
Matthew John "Matt" Matern (write-in)20.00%
Eric Merrill (write-in)10.00%
Michael Dename (write-in)  
Jeffrey H. Drobman (write-in)  
Heather Marie Stagg (write-in)  
Total36,833,956100.00%

Popular vote total includes AK, AL, AR, AS, AZ, CA, CT, DA, DC, DE, FL, GA, GU, HI, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MP, MS, MT, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, PR, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, VI, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY. No popular vote for UN.

 
 

States Chronologically   States Alphabetically
 
Democratic Convention
AK AL AR AS AZ CA CO CT DA DC DE FL GA GU HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MP MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA PR RI SC SD TN TX UN UT VA VI VT WA WI WV WY
 
Republican Convention
AK AL AR AS AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA GU HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MP MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA PR RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VI VT WA WI WV WY

 
 

2 April 2020, Due to the COVID-19 virus, the party has moved the National Convention from 13-16 July to 17-20 August.

24 June 2020: The Democratic National Committee announced that the National Convention will be mostly virtual with the delegates voting remotely.

2020 Presidential Campaign Resources from the Democratic National Committee.

10 July 2020: The Democratic National Committee announced that National Convention Delegates may vote via the internet from 3 to 15 August. The votes are tallied by the state party. The state party submits the tally sheet to the Secretary's Office. The votes will be counted on 15 August.


Commentary 17 August 2020:
LET THE 'ZOOM' MEETINGS...
I MEAN, CONVENTIONS BEGIN!

by RICHARD E. BERG-ANDERSSON
TheGreenPapers.com Staff

 

 
Roll Call Vote - 18 August 2020 - (Youtube Recording)
JurisdictionVotesBidenSandersabstention
Alabama60528 
Alaska19127 
American Samoa1111  
Arizona805129 
Arkansas36279 
California494263231 
Colorado7942361
Connecticut7575  
Delaware32***Biden's home State PASSES***
Democrats Abroad17710 
District of Columbia44431 
Florida24919257 
Georgia117117  
Guam13112 
Hawaii32239 
Idaho25169 
Illinois18112259 
Indiana88862 
Iowa493811 
Kansas453510 
Kentucky6060  
Louisiana6060  
Maine31229 
Maryland1201191 
Massachusetts1138330 
Michigan1459253 
Minnesota916031 
Mississippi40382 
Missouri785028 
Montana19181 
Nebraska3333  
Nevada492524 
New Hampshire33249 
New Jersey1441395 
New Mexico46424 
New York32127744 
North Carolina1228339 
North Carolina puts Joseph Robinette "Joe" Biden, Jr. "over the top" with 2,448 votes. 2,375 votes are necessary to nominate.
North Dakota18810 
Mariana Islands1192 
Ohio15413420 
Oklahoma372413 
Oregon735716 
Pennsylvania20917534 
Puerto Rico58535 
Rhode Island35341 
South Carolina644915 
South Dakota20173 
Tennessee735023 
Texas260161981
Utah331617 
Vermont24915 
Virgin Islands1313  
Virginia1239132 
Washington1096643 
West Virginia3434  
Wyoming181143
Wisconsin976730 
Delaware3232  
Totals 4,714 3,558 1,151 5
JurisdictionVotesBidenSandersabstention
 

 

Commentary 22 August 2020:
A summary of the 2020 DEMOCRATIC PARTY NATIONAL CONVENTION
by RICHARD E. BERG-ANDERSSON
TheGreenPapers.com Staff


   

Wednesday 26 June - Thursday 27 June 2019 at 9PM ET: 1st Democratic Primary Debate in Miami (NBC News, MSNBC, Telemundo).

The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida

Candidate qualifications: 1% in 3 national polls or raising $65,000 or more from at least 200 donors in at least 20 states. Debates are limited to 20 candidates. If more than 20 candidates qualify, those with the lowest polling averages are eliminated.

On 13 June 2019, the DNC announced the following candidates have qualified: Colorado Senator Michael Bennet; former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.; New Jersey Senator Cory Booker; South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former housing secretary Julián Castro of Texas; New York, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio; former Maryland Congressman John Delaney; Hawaii Congressman Tulsi Gabbard; New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand; California Senator Kamala Harris; former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper; Washington Governor Jay Inslee; Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar; former Congressman Texas Beto O'Rourke; Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan; Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders; California Congressman Eric Swalwell; Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren; Marianne Williamson of California; and Andrew Yang of New York.

  • First night: Cory Booker, Julián Castro, Bill de Blasio, John Delaney, Tulsi Gabbard, Jay Inslee, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O’Rourke, Tim Ryan, and Elizabeth Warren.
  • Second night: Michael Bennet, Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, John Hickenlooper, Bernie Sanders, Eric Swalwell, Marianne Williamson, and Andrew Yang.

Moderators are Savannah Guthrie, Lester Holt, Chuck Todd, Rachel Maddow, and José Diaz-Balart.

 

Tuesday 30 July - Wednesday 31 July 2019: 2nd Democratic Primary Debate in Detroit (CNN).

The qualifications for candidates are the same as those for the first debate.

On 18 July 2019, the DNC announced the following candidates have qualified: former Vice President Joe Biden from Deleware; Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders; California Senator Kamala Harris; Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren; South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Texas Congressman Beto O'Rourke; New Jersey Senator Cory Booker; Andrew Yang of New York; former HUD Secretary Julián Castro of Texas; Hawaii Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard; Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar; Marianne Williamson of California; Washington Governor Jay Inslee; New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand; former Maryland Congressman John Delaney; former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper; Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan; Colorado Senator Michael Bennet; New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio; and Montana Governor Steve Bullock.

  • First night: Michael Bennet, Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Julián Castro, Bill de Blasio, Tulsi Gabbard, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Jay Inslee, and Andrew Yang.
  • Second night: Steve Bullock, Pete Buttigieg, John Delaney, John Hickenlooper, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Tim Ryan, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Marianne Williamson.
 

Thursday 12 September 2019: 3rd Democratic Primary Debate in Houston (ABC News, Univision).

Candidate qualifications: 2% in 4 national polls or raising $130,000 or more from at least 400 donors in at least 20 states. Debates are limited to 20 candidates. If more than 20 candidates qualify, those with the lowest polling averages are eliminated.

On 29 August 2019, the DNC announced the following candidates have qualified: Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. from Deleware; New Jersey Senator Cory Booker; South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former HUD Secretary Julián Castro of Texas; California Senator Kamala Harris; Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar; former Texas Representative Beto O’Rourke; Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders; Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren; Andrew Yang of New York.

 

Tuesday 15 October 2019: 4th Democratic Primary Debate in Ohio (CNN, The New York Times).

The qualifications for candidates are the same as those for the third debate.

On 27 September 2019, the DNC announced the following candidates have qualified: Former Vice President Joe Biden; New Jersey Senator Cory Booker; South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro; Hawaii Congressman Tulsi Gabbard; California Senator Kamala Harris; Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar; former Texas Congressman Beto O'Rourke; Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer; Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

Location: Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio

 

Wednesday 20 November 2019: 5th Democratic Primary Debate in Atlanta, Georgia (CNN, The New York Times).

Candidate qualifications: 3% in at least 4 national polls or 5% state polls in 2 early primary states (Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Nevada); and raising donations from at least 165,000 unique donors; and having 600 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

On 14 November 2019, he DNC announced the following 10 candidates have qualified: former Vice President Joe Biden, New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Hawaii Congressman Tulsi Gabbard, California Senator Kamala Harris, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

Moderators: Rachel Maddow, Andrea Mitchell, Kristen Welker, and Ashley Parker.

 

Thursday 19 December 2019: 6th Democratic Debate in Los Angeles, California (Politico and PBS NewsHour).

Candidate qualifications: 4% in at least 4 national polls or early primary states (Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Nevada) or 6% in 2 early primary states; and raising donations from at least 200,000 unique donors; and having 800 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

 

Tuesday 14 January 2020: 7th Democratic Debate in Des Moines, Iowa (CNN.com, desmoinesregister.com, Android, Apple, Roku, and Chromecas).

Candidate qualifications: 5% in at least 4 national polls or 7% in at least 2 early states (Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Nevada); and raising donations from at least 225,000 unique donors; and having 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

Candidates: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Thomas F. Steyer, and Elizabeth Warren.

 

Friday 7 February 2020: 8th Democratic Debate in Manchester, New Hampshire (ABC News, Apple News and WMUR-TV).

Candidate qualifications: Recieved at least one pledged National Convention Delegate in the Iowa caucuses OR one of: (a) receive 5% or more in at least 4 polls (national polls, or New Hampshire, or South Carolina, or Nevada) or, (b) receive 7% or more support in New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada AND receive Contributions from at least 225,000 unique donors, with a minimum of 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 States, Territories or the District of Columbia.

Candidates: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

 

Wednesday 19 February 2020: 9th Democratic Debate in Las Vegas (NBC News, MSNBC and the Nevada Independent).

Candidate qualifications: Received at least 1 Pledged delegate in the Iowa Caucuses or New Hampshire Primary OR, polled 10% in at least 4 national polls or 12% in the remaining early states (South Carolina and Nevada).

Candidates: former Vice-President Joseph R. BIDEN, Jr., former New York City Mayor Michael R. BLOOMBERG, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Peter P.M. BUTTIGIEG, Senator Amy J. KLOBUCHAR of Minnesota, Senator Bernard SANDERS of Vermont, and Senator Elizabeth A. WARREN of Massachusetts.

 

Tuesday 25 February 2020: 10th Democratic Debate in South Carolina in Charleston (CBS, Congressional Black Caucus Institute, Twitter).

Candidate qualifications: Reach 10% in 4 approved national polls or 12% in South Carolina polls OR winning at least 1 delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

Candidates: former Vice-President Joseph R. BIDEN, Jr., former New York City Mayor Michael R. BLOOMBERG, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Peter P.M. BUTTIGIEG, Senator Amy J. KLOBUCHAR of Minnesota, Senator Bernard SANDERS of Vermont, Businessman Thomas F. STEYER, Senator Elizabeth A. WARREN of Massachusetts.

 

Friday 6 March 2020: Confirmation of Automatic delegates of 770 Automatic Delegates.

The Automatic (unpledged party leader and elected official) delegates are assigned automatically by virtue of respective public or Party office. [Delegate Selection Rules 9.A.].

 

Sunday 15 March 2020: 11th Democratic Primary Debate in Pheonix (CNN, Univision, Congressional Hispanic Caucus)). "Out of an abundance of caution and in order to reduce cross-country travel, all parties have decided that the best path forward is to hold Sunday's debate at CNN’s studio in Washington, D.C., with no live audience."

Candidate qualifications: Receiving at least 20% of the delegates awarded as of 15 March.

Candidates: former Vice-President Joseph R. BIDEN, Jr. and Senator Bernard SANDERS of Vermont.

 

April 2020 (presumably): 12th Democratic Primary Debate.

 

Monday 17 August - Thursday 20 August 2020: 48th Democratic National Convention, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The date was first announced on 16 June 2018 and the location on 11 March 2019. The date was updated do to the COVID-19 virus.

The 48th DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION will have a total of 4,749 delegate votes.

  • Either, a majority of pledged delegate votes, 1,990 of 3,979, must support a single candidate on the first ballot, or a majority of all (pledged and automatic) delegate votes, 2,375 of 4,749, must support a single candidate on any ballot necessary in order for a Presidential candidate to be nominated.
  • A majority of all (pledged and automatic) delegate votes, 2,375 of 4,749, is necessary in order for a Vice-Presidential candidate to be nominated.

"The rules for the 2020 Democratic National Convention specify a formula to be used in determining the allocation of delegate votes to each state and jurisdiction sending a delegation to the Convention. For the details see The Math Behind the Democratic Delegate Allocation.

The breakdown of the delegate votes is as follows:

  • 3,489 Base delegate votes (2,583 district delegate votes and 906 at-large delegate votes)
  • 490 Pledged PLEOs (meaning a total of 3,979 delegate votes to be determined by either a primary or a caucus/convention system in each state or other jurisdiction)
  • 770 Automatic (Unpledged) delegate votes.
  • TOTAL: 4,749 delegate votes.

There will actually be more delegates on the floor of the Democratic National Convention than there are delegate votes [which is why I use the term "delegate votes" in the first place]. Some jursidictions will have more delegate seats than actual delegate votes at that Convention [as a result of which, some delegates from some states will have to cast fractional votes during roll calls on the Convention floor]. There will be 4,749 delegate votes at the 47th Democratic National Convention, but there will be 4,753 actual delegates on the floor of the Convention (in other words, 4 more delegates than votes)... here's why:

  • DEMOCRATS ABROAD, with 17 delegate votes, will have 21 delegates.
    • 8 unpledged Democratic National Committee members each casts ½ vote for a total of 4 votes.

"In a relative handful of cases, a Member of Congress or a Governor is also a member of the Democratic National Committee (in some of these cases, such as that of the Democrats' Congressional Leaders- House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi - Members of Congress are DNC members ex-officio; in other cases, however, they represent various associated committees or organizations affiliated with the DNC: for example, U.S. Senators sit on the DNC as representatives of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee- likewise, Congressmen and Governors sit on the DNC as representatives of, respectively, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Democratic Governors' Association); the Democratic Party lists these Unpledged PLEOs who are DNC members as well as holders of elective office solely as DNC members (in other words, as far as the Party is concerned, these people are "Party Leaders" more than "Elected Officials"). However, it is the considered opinion of "The Green Papers" that the average user of this web site is going to think of these few Unpledged PLEOs who are in the unique position of being both PLs AND EOs more in terms of their elected office than their DNC membership: as a result, "The Green Papers" has "converted" DNC members who happen also to be Governors, Senators and Representatives to their political office from their DNC membership. Therefore, the breakdown in each state or other jurisdiction of Unpledged PLEOs as posted on "The Green Papers" may differ somewhat from that put out by the Democratic Party itself: where this is the case, it is so indicated on the appropriate DEMOCRAT page for the affected state or other jurisdiction."


Terminology:

  • PLEOs = Party Leaders and Elected Officials.
  • Unpledged PLEOs = Superdelegates.
  • District + at-large delegates = Base delegates.
  • Base delegates + Pledged PLEOs are the only delegates chosen through a Democratic presidential Primary or Caucus/Convention procedure and, thus, allocated to presidential contenders.
  • All Unpledged delegates (Unpledged PLEOs) are automatically uncommitted and are held aside rather than allocated to presidential contenders through a Primary or Caucus/Convention.

 

Notes

Primary dates marked "presumably" and polling times marked "reportedly" are based on unofficial or estimated data (especially as regards local variations from a jurisdictionwide statutory and/or regulatory standard) and are, thereby, subject to change.

1 Democratic Party's "First Determining Step" of the delegate selection process.

 


  Election 2020 - Presidential Primary, Caucus, and Convention Home  
 
  Presidential Candidates  
 
  States Alphabetically  
  Events Chronologically  
  Major Events Chronologically  
  Poll Closing Times Chronologically   --   Poll Closing Times Alphabetically  
  Democratic "First Determining Step" Chronologically  
 
  Chronological Cumulative Allocation of Delegates  
  Weekly Delegate Distribution and Availability  
 
Delegate Counts
  Democratic Pledged and Unpledged Summary   --   Republican Pledged and Unpledged Summary  
  Democratic Hard and Soft Summary   --   Republican Hard and Soft Summary  
  Democratic Hard and Floor Summary   --   Republican Hard and Floor Summary  
 
Delegate Allocation
  Democratic Quick Reference   --   Republican Quick Reference  
  The Math Behind the Democratic Delegate Allocation   --   The Math Behind the Republican Delegate Allocation  
  Democratic Timing Penalties and Bonuses  
 
  Democratic Delegate Pledging and Voter Eligibility   --   Republican Delegate Binding and Voter Eligibility  
 
  Primaries at a Glance  
 
  Results Status and Date Retreived  
....
  Estimating the Delegate Count  
....

 
Documentation
  Historical Analysis of the Presidential Nominating Process  
  Historical Analysis of the apportionment of delegate votes at the National Conventions of the two major parties  
  Primary/Caucus/Convention Glossary  
  Statutory Election Information of the Several states / Presidential Primary  
  Dates of PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES re: selection and/or allocation/distribution of Delegates to Major Party National Conventions  
 
  Major Third Party Presidential Nomination Process  
 
  Straw Polls  
 
  (download)