Original posting: 2008oct30, Last update: 2017jan09

TheGreenPapers.com

ELECTORAL VOTE for Vice-President of the United States
(as officially counted and, where appropriate, compared
to the "appointed" Presidential Electors as pledged):
1828--


NOTE: This table is intended to be a companion to (and utilized in coordination with) the table re: ELECTORAL VOTE for President: 1828--: differences between the Presidential Electors as pledged via the General Election and the final Electoral Vote for President will be found therein. This table attempts to illustrate the same re: the final Electoral Vote for Vice-President.

(Parties) within parentheses on this table indicate the person considered to be the principal candidate- where not also (as is usually the case) the official nominee- of the Party so indicated for the office in question.

Incumbent Vice President seeking re-election to that office in boldface


 
Year [Election No.]Final ELECTORAL VOTE as counted and tabulated by the U.S. Congress"Appointed" Electors as pledged in the General Election for President (shown only where this differs from the final Electoral Vote for Vice-President re: the same National Ticket[s])
Person declared VICE PRESIDENT-ELECTother Electoral Votes for Vice-Presidentleading MAJOR PARTY standard-bearertrailing MAJOR PARTY standard-bearerOther pledged Electors for President
1828 [11] CALHOUN ("Jackson" Republican) 171 Rush ("Adams" Republican) 83; Smith 7 Jackson 178 Adams 83 ---
1832 [12]VAN BUREN (Democratic Republican) 189Sergeant (National Republican) 49; Wilkins 30; Lee ("Nullifier" Democrat) 11; Ellmaker (Anti-Mason) 7Jackson (Democratic Republican) 219Clay (National Republican) 49Floyd ("Nullifier" Democrat) 11; Wirt (Anti-Mason) 7
1836 [13]NONEJohnson (Democrat) 147; Granger (Whig) 77; Tyler 47; Smith 23Van Buren (Democrat) 170total Electors pledged to Whig presidential candidates: 124---
1840 [14]TYLER (Whig) 234Johnson (Democrat) 48; Tazewell 11; Polk 1Harrison (Whig) 234Van Buren (Dem) 60---
1844 [15]DALLAS (Democrat) 170Frelinghuysen (Whig) 105   
1848 [16]FILLMORE (Whig) 163Butler (Democrat) 127   
1852 [17]KING (Democrat) 254Graham (Whig) 42   
1856 [18]BRECKINRIDGE (Democrat) 174Dayton (Republican) 114; Donelson(American/Whig) 8   
1860 [19]HAMLIN (Republican) 180Lane (Southern Democrat) 72; Everett (Constitutional Union) 39; Johnson (Northern Democrat) 12   
1864 [20]JOHNSON (Union Republican) 212Pendleton (Democrat) 21; not voting 1Lincoln (Union Rep) 213McClellan (Dem) 21---
1868 [21]COLFAX (Republican) 214Blair (Democrat) 80   
1872 [22]WILSON (Republican) 286Brown (Democrat/Liberal Republican) 47; others [see verbiage underneath this table] 19; not counted 14Grant (Rep) 300Greeley (Dem & Lib Rep) 66---
1876 [23]WHEELER (Republican) 185Hendricks (Democrat) 184Tilden (Dem) 184Hayes (Rep) 16520 in dispute
1880 [24]ARTHUR (Rep) 214English (Democrat) 155   
1884 [25]HENDRICKS (Democrat) 219Logan (Republican) 182   
1888 [26]MORTON (Republican) 233Thurman (Democrat) 168   
1892 [27]STEVENSON (Democrat) 277Reid (Republican) 145; Field (Populist) 22   
1896 [28]HOBART (Republican) 271Sewall (Democrat) 149; Watson (Populist) 27McKinley (Rep) 271Bryan (Dem & Pop) 176---
1900 [29]ROOSEVELT (Republican) 292Stevenson (Democrat) 155   
1904 [30]FAIRBANKS (Republican) 336Davis (Democrat) 140   
1908 [31]SHERMAN (Republican) 321Kern (Democrat) 162   
1912 [32]MARSHALL (Democrat) 435Johnson ("Bull Moose" Progressive) 88; Butler (Republican) 8   
1916 [33]MARSHALL (Democrat) 277Fairbanks (Republican) 254   
1920 [34]COOLIDGE (Republican) 404Roosevelt (Democrat) 127   
1924 [35]DAWES (Republican) 382Bryan (Democrat) 136; Wheeler (Progressive) 13   
1928 [36]CURTIS (Republican) 444Robinson (Democrat) 87   
1932 [37]GARNER (Democrat) 472Curtis (Republican) 59   
1936 [38]GARNER (Democrat) 523Knox (Republican) 8   
1940 [39]WALLACE (Democrat) 449Willkie (Republican) 82   
1944 [40]TRUMAN (Democrat) 432Bricker (Republican) 99   
1948 [41]BARKLEY (Democrat) 303Warren (Republican) 189; Wright (State's Rights "Dixiecrat") 39Truman (Dem) 304Dewey (Rep) 189Thurmond ("Dixiecrat") 38
1952 [42]NIXON (Republican) 442Sparkman (Democrat) 89   
1956 [43]NIXON (Republican) 457Kefauver (Democrat) 73; Talmadge 1Eisenhower (Rep) 457Stevenson (Dem) 74---
1960 [44]JOHNSON (Democrat) 303Lodge (Republican) 219; Thurmond 14; Goldwater 1Kennedy (Dem) 303Nixon (Rep) 220['Unpledged' Democrat] 14
1964 [45]HUMPHREY (Democrat) 486Miller (Republican) 52   
1968 [46]AGNEW (Republican) 301Muskie (Democrat) 191; LeMay (American Independent) 46Nixon (Rep) 302Humphrey (Dem) 191Wallace (Amer Ind) 45
1972 [47]AGNEW (Republican) 520Shriver (Democrat) 17; Nathan (Libertarian) 1Nixon (Rep) 521McGovern (Dem) 17---
1976 [48]MONDALE (Democrat) 297Dole (Republican) 241   
1980 [49]BUSH (Republican) 489Mondale (Democrat) 49   
1984 [50]BUSH (Republican) 525Ferraro (Democrat) 13   
1988 [51]QUAYLE (Republican) 426Bentsen (Democrat) 111; Dukakis 1Bush (Rep) 426Dukakis (Dem) 112---
1992 [52]GORE (Democrat) 370Quayle (Republican) 168   
1996 [53]GORE (Democrat) 379Kemp (Republican) 159   
2000 [54]CHENEY (Republican) 271Lieberman (Democrat) 266; not voting 1Bush (Rep) 271Gore (Dem) 267---
2004 [55]CHENEY (Republican) 286Edwards (Democrat) 252   
2008 [56]BIDEN (Democrat) 365Palin (Republican) 173   
2012 [57]BIDEN (Democrat) 332Ryan (Republican) 206   
2016 [58]PENCE (Republican) 305Kaine (Democrat) 227; Warren 2; Cantwell 1; Collins 1; Fiorina 1; LaDuke 1 Trump (Rep) 306Clinton (Dem) 232---
Year [Election No.]Person declared VICE PRESIDENT-ELECTother Electoral Votes for Vice-Presidentleading MAJOR PARTY standard-bearertrailing MAJOR PARTY standard-bearerOther pledged Electors for President
Final ELECTORAL VOTE as counted and tabulated by the U.S. Congress"Appointed" Electors as pledged in the General Election for President (shown only where this differs from the final Electoral Vote for Vice-President re: the same National Ticket[s])
 

1828: Calhoun, who had been Vice President under President John Quincy Adams (though he had not been, in any way, Adams' "running mate" back in 1824 [the presidential and vice-presidential votes of Presidential Electors in that Election had been virtually separate from each other]), had agreed to run jointly with Jackson in this Election; nevertheless, 7 of Georgia's 9 Jackson Electors opted to cast their vice-presidential votes for Smith.

1832: Van Buren had been officially nominated for Vice-President by the Democratic Republicans in the very first Major Party National Convention ever held; nevertheless, all 30 of Pennsylvania's Democratic Republican Jackson Electors opted to cast their vice-presidential votes for Wilkins.

1836: No one was declared elected Vice-President in the Tabulation Joint Session of Congress immediately following this Election because no candidate for the office had attained the majority of 148 necessary to elect (there were a total of 294 Electoral Votes in this Election): Democrat Johnson- the leader in Electoral Votes- had received the votes of exactly half the Electors. There had been quite a few objections to Johnson (who had just barely cleared the 2/3 necessary to nominate in that year's Democratic National Convention by 1 delegate vote) even being on the National Ticket- not the least of which was that his common law wife happened to be an African-American, but there were also accusations of such "frontier" (Johnson was from still frontier-like Kentucky) behavior such as cussing in front of ladies, overly imbibing in alcoholic drinks in public and the like: largely as a result of all this, all 23 of Virginia's Democratic Van Buren Electors chose to vote for Smith instead of Johnson. Meanwhile, because of the strategy employed by the Whigs as regards the presidential side of things (please see re: this 1836 Election underneath the table re: ELECTORAL VOTE for President: 1828--), there- likewise- were different Whig Party vice-presidential candidates in various States: the 124 Whig Electors, thus, split their vice-presidential votes between Granger (who was, more or less, the "regular" Whig vice-presidential candidate) and Tyler (who, although a Democrat, was popular among many Whigs because- as a U.S. Senator- he had resigned rather than be instructed by his State- Virginia- to recant a Senate resolution censuring President Jackson [this popularity among Whigs well explains why Tyler would become the Whig vice-presidential nominee four years later]). Since no one had received a majority of the Electoral Vote for Vice-President, the U.S. Senate (for the only time in its history) elected the Vice President, choosing JOHNSON (Democrat) over Granger (Whig) by a vote of 33-16.

1840: Because of the continuing controversies over the personal life of Vice President Johnson, the Democratic National Convention opted to nominate their National Ticket by committee, subject to later ratification by the Convention, even though there was no real question that President Van Buren would be re-nominated (interestingly, a long-ago "foreshadowing" at least somewhat analogous to what is regularly done nowadays [the apparent Major Party presidential nominee coming out of the Primaries and Caucuses naming his own running mate, subject to formal approval by the Convention later on]). In the end, however, the committee recommended that no formal nomination for Vice President be made (evidently in order to avoid the potential for a nasty floor fight at the Convention over Johnson's renomination): thus, the 60 Democratic Van Buren Electors were fully free to vote for anyone they wished for Vice-President and 12 of these opted to do so.

1864: The same Republican Lincoln Elector in Nevada who failed to cast a presidential ballot also did not cast a vice-presidential vote: thus, Johnson received 1 fewer Electoral Vote than had been pledged to him via the General Election. The label "Union Republican", by the way, was used by the Republicans in this Election so as to extend a welcome to so-called 'War Democrats' (Democrats who fervently supported the Union cause in the Civil War still ongoing at the time) such as Johnson himself.

1872: The untimely death of Democratic standard-bearer Greeley just before the Electors actually cast their votes after the General Election itself also caused a divided vote in the vice-presidential Electoral balloting: Brown (who had been the person formally nominated for vice-presidency by the Democrats) received the vice-presidential votes of all 42 Greeley Electors who had cast their presidential votes for Hendricks, the 2 who had voted for Jenkins and the 3 who had voted for Greeley (although the presidential votes of these last were not counted [because the person they had voted for was deceased], their vice-presidential votes were accepted by Congress). Meanwhile, the 18 Greeley Electors who had voted for Brown for President and the 1 Greeley Elector who had cast his presidential vote for Davis voted- on the vice-presidential ballot- for someone other than Brown (thus, unlike John Edwards in 2004, Brown would not be voted for President and Vice-President by the same Presidential Elector!), as follows: Colquitt 5; Julian 5; Bramlette 3; Palmer 3; Banks 1; Groesbeck 1; Machen 1. Unlike the others, Julian and Banks represented the Liberal Republican Party, not the Democratic (Greeley and Brown had also been nominated for President and Vice-President by the Liberal Republicans, Republicans who were opposed to the excesses of the Grant Administration). The 14 vice-presidential votes not counted by Congress were, as was the case on the presidential side, actually votes for the Republican National Ticket (in this particular case, for Wilson for Vice-President) cast by Republican Grant Electors from Arkansas and Louisiana, two States where apparently widespread voting irregularities led Congress to completely discount the results.

1876: As a result of the decisions of the temporary 'Electoral Commission'- hastily set up by Congress to deal with this (in)famous 'disputed Election'- to grant all 20 disputed Electoral Votes to the Republican National Ticket, Wheeler was declared by Congress to have been elected Vice President at the same time Hayes was declared President-elect (on 2 March 1877, just two days before outgoing President Grant's second term expired!)

1896: Bryan was the standard-bearer of both the Democratic and People's (Populist) Parties but each Party had nominated different candidates for Vice-President at their respective National Conventions, hence the divided vice-presidential vote amongst Bryan Electors as a result of this Election.

1948: The so-called 'Faithless' Democrat Truman Elector in this Election also cast a vice-presidential vote for State's Rights vice-presidential candidate Wright instead of Barkley.

1956: The so-called 'Faithless' Democrat Stevenson Elector in this Election also cast a vice-presidential vote for Talmadge instead of Kefauver.

1960: The 14 'Unpledged' Democratic Electors cast their vice-presidential votes for Thurmond; meanwhile, the so-called 'Faithless' Republican Nixon Elector in this Election also cast a vice-presidential vote for Goldwater instead of Lodge.

1968: The so-called 'Faithless' Republican Nixon Elector in this Election also cast a vice-presidential vote for American Independent vice-presidential candidate LeMay instead of Agnew.

1972: The so-called 'Faithless' Republican Nixon Elector in this Election also cast a vice-presidential vote for Libertarian vice-presidential candidate Nathan instead of Agnew. (Theodora Nathan, thus, became the first woman to ever receive an Electoral Vote officially counted and tabulated by Congress).

1988: The so-called 'Faithless' Democrat Dukakis Elector in this Election also cast a vice-presidential vote for Dukakis instead of Bentsen (having cast a presidential Electoral Vote for Bentsen instead of Dukakis).

2000: The so-called 'Faithless' Democrat Gore Elector in this Election also cast a 'blank' vice-presidential vote.

2016: 5 so-called 'Faithless' Democrat Hillary Clinton Electors in this Election (4 from Washington State; 1 from Hawaii) also cast their vice-presidential votes for other candidates (instead of Tim Kaine) as follows: 2 for Warren; 1 each for Cantwell, Collins and LaDuke. There were also 2 so-called 'Faithless' Republican Donald Trump Electors (both from Texas): 1 of these also cast a vice-presidential vote for Fiorina (instead of Mike Pence); however, the other cast his vice-presidential vote, as pledged, for Mike Pence. Mike Pence, thereby, became the third vice-presidential candidate to have ended up with more Electoral Votes than the presidential candidate heading the National Ticket on which he ran.